Smallholder Planted Forests and Trees for Climate, Restored Landscapes, and Livelihoods

January 4, 2023

The Yale Forest Forum is excited to announce the next speaker series for spring 2023, taking place on Tuesdays, January 17 - April 25th from 12:00 - 1:00 pm US ET. Hosted by The Forest School at the Yale School of the Environment in collaboration with the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations.

Smallholder Planted Forests and Trees for Climate, Restored Landscapes, and Livelihoods

Planted forests, defined as forests that at maturity are predominantly composed of trees established through planting and/or deliberate seeding[i] represent 7 percent of global forest area[ii]. While the world’s natural forests are shrinking, with 420 million ha of forest lost through deforestation over the last 30 years[iii], the surface of planted forests is continuously expanding. Planted forests and trees outside of forests e.g., woodlots, fruit trees, hedgerows, etc. harbor an untapped potential to fulfill future needs through area expansion and productivity increases in existing planted forests[iv].

A significant portion of planted forests and trees outside forests are owned and/or managed by smallholders. Smallholder forestry usually takes place on land privately owned by non-industrial stakeholders. While smallholder forestry has a long history in Western Europe and North America, it has rapidly expanded in recent years to other parts of the globe[v]. Between 1990 and 2005, the area under smallholder ownership has increased three-fold[vi] and by 2005, smallholders owned 26% of planted forests globally[vii], largely exceeding planted forest area under corporate ownership. Furthermore, planted forests managed for productive functions made up 32% of all global planted forest area[viii].

Despite these increases, smallholders face technical, commercial, policy, and institutional challenges that hamper their performance, negatively impact their returns on investment, and ultimately affect their long-term viability. As reported by FAO[ix], smallholders have driven the dramatic expansion of tree plantations worldwide in the recent past and this trend may reverse if smallholders are forced to change from forestry to another land use.

This webinar series will focus on ways to harness the potential of smallholder planted forests and trees to contribute to the provision of environmental services, including addressing climate change, and livelihoods. It will primarily focus on the following questions:

  • What are the key success factors in the establishment and management of planted forests and trees outside forests by smallholders?
  • Which management objectives do smallholders pursue and how are they implemented according to business best-practices?
  • What are the operational risks, financial risks, and vulnerabilities smallholders face related to quickly evolving markets and a changing climate?
  • Which models and practices are most promising?
  • Which opportunities and business models arise from the transition towards carbon-neutral economies and the global momentum for ecosystem restoration?
  • What can be done to support smallholders? (i.e., policy, producers’ organizations, etc.

Join us every Tuesday from January 17 – April 25 from 12:00 – 1:00 pm U.S. ET. Note there will be no webinar on March 14 and March 21.

Connecticut Certified Forest Practitioners may receive 1.0 CEU credits for each live lecture attended. Email yff@yale.edu (link sends e-mail) for further details.

Click here to register. Register once to attend all webinars and view the recordings

Date Speaker Organization Theme

Webinar (recording, slides, and reading)

January 17

Thaís Linhares-Juvenal - Team Leader Sustainable Forestry, Value Chain Innovation Stream; Secretary of the International Commission on Poplars and Other Fast-Growing Trees Sustainning People and the Environment (IPC), Forestry Division

FAO (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations)

Series Introduction and Overview

Recording 

Slides                        

January 24

Bob Kazungu - Ag. Assistant Commissioner for Forestry, Assessment and Monitoring

Ministry of Water and Environment, Uganda Policies, Investments, and Capacity Development

Recording

Slides

Reading

Reference Materials

January 31 Stefano Bisoffi - Consultant on International Agricultural Research (2018-), Former Scientific and Technical Director of CREA

CREA Italy (Council for Agricultural Research and Economics)

Research and Innovation

Recording

Slides

Reading      

February 7 Charles Nyanjui FFSPAK (Farm Forestry Smallholder Producers Association of Kenya)

The Role of Producers’ Organizations

Recording

Slides

Reading

February 14

Miriam Dkhil - Director of Sustainable Development and South-South Cooperation

Credit Agricole du Maroc

Access to Financial Services

Recording

Slides

February 21

Jelmer Van de Mortel - Head of Acorn Acorn, Rabobank Unlocking Carbon Farming

Recording

Slides

Reading

         

February 28

Richard Donovan - Senior Forest Advisor

Independent Consultant/Rainforest Alliance Certification Schemes

Recording

Slides

March 7 Dianne Staal Wasterlund - Lecturer Swedish Univeristy of Agricultural Sciences Technology and Risk Management

Recording

Slides

March 28 Stephanie Chizmar - Research Economist, Southern Research Station, Forest Economics and Policy U.S. Forest Service
 
Resilience to Climate Change

Recording

Slides

Reading

April 4

Amanda Rau (TBC)

The Nature Conservancy

Fire Management

Recording

Slides

April 11 Meredith Martin - Professor of Silviculture and Forest Ecology North Carolina State University NGO Tree Planting

Recording

Slides

Reading

April 18 Marlito Bande (TBC) Visaya State University Forest Restoration

Recording

Slides

April 25 Zoraida Calle (TBC) CIPAV Agroforestry

Recording

Slides

Reading


[i] ​FAO. 2020. Global Forest Resources Assessment 2020: Main report. Rome. https://doi.org/10.4060/ca9825en

[ii] FAO. 2022. The State of the World’s Forests 2022. Forest pathways for green recovery and building inclusive, resilient and sustainable economies. Rome, FAO. https://doi.org/10.4060/cb9360en

[iii]  From 1990 to 2020. FAO. 2022. The State of the World’s Forests 2022. Forest pathways for green recovery and building inclusive, resilient and sustainable economies. Rome, FAO. https://doi.org/10.4060/cb9360en

[iv] FAO. 2022. Global forest sector outlook 2050: Assessing future demand and sources of timber for a sustainable economy – Background paper for The State of the World’s Forests 2022. FAO Forestry Working Paper, No. 31. Rome. Provisional. https://doi.org/10.4060/cc2265en

[v] Gilmour, D. 2016. Forty years of community-based forestry: A review of its extent and effectiveness. FAO Forestry Paper 176.

[vi] FAO. 2006. Global planted forests thematic study: results and analysis, by A. Del Lungo, J. Ball and J. Carle. Planted Forests and Trees Working Paper 38. Rome (also available at www.fao.org/forestry/site/10368/en).

[vii] Those owing forests of less than 100 ha. Evans, J. 2009. Planted forests: uses, impacts and sustainability. Cabi.

[viii] FAO. 2005. Global forest resources assessment 2005. Progress towards sustainable forest management. FAO Forestry Paper 147. Rome, FAO.

[ix] Gilmour, D. 2016. Forty years of community-based forestry: A review of its extent and effectiveness. FAO Forestry Paper 176.